Who is where? Why? And is it Just? | Qui est où? Pourquoi? Et est-ce juste?

Who is where? Why? And is it Just? | Qui est où? Pourquoi? Et est-ce juste?
28 Aug 2018 by Letitia Meynell

 

Le français suit.

This week the CPA’s Equity Committee released a new website offering a set of good equity practices designed to help address the underrepresentation of various groups in philosophy. (As some of the issues are rather different in French-speaking departments, straightforward translation is inappropriate, so we are currently collaborating with the Comité Équité of the Société de Philosophie du Québec to create a French version.) 

Some folks might wonder whether trying to modify our practices in order to diversify our discipline is really necessary, supposing instead that professional philosophy in Canada is just fine as it is. They may think that these efforts are either pointless or, worse yet, an effort to hijack academic philosophy for various political ends. Rather than directly engaging these concerns through the usual means—employing concepts like “systemic discrimination,” “microaggressions,” “oppression,” “identity,” “feminism,” and “white supremacy”—which many people seem to find rather off-putting, I offer a different approach. I hope that it will give people who are not typically sympathetic to taking equity seriously a way of thinking about these issues that helps them to see why many believe that academic philosophy has a serious problem and we all should work to fix it.

My approach is quite generic and can be used as a way of thinking about any place in society where various groups are systematically under- or over- represented. Basically, it boils down to asking three questions: What is the distribution of various groups? How did they get where they are? And is the situation just? 

Regarding the first question, ceteris paribus one would expect the population of professional Canadian philosophers to reflect, roughly, the Canadian population at large—half women, 15 out of 20 white, 1 in 20 Indigenous, 1 in 10 having a disability of some kind (and so on). Choose your preferred level of statistical significance and that will tell you how much divergence from this is too surprising to be the result of chance.

The second question simply tries to understand what caused this divergence from the general population. I find it useful to think about this in terms of selection processes, analogous to those discussed in evolutionary biology (though, obviously, without inheritance playing a role). After all, we are talking about populations and how various subpopulations with socially significant traits find themselves in environments (i.e., academia in general and philosophy in particular) that are more or less conducive to their academic and personal flourishing. 

There are a number of virtues of approaching it in this way. First, selection theory acknowledges that each individual has a unique life path and that the identification of selection pressures is an idealization that captures general trends that have population level effects. It thus discourages thinking that if one person from a particular group has achieved success, then anybody from that group can. Still, some individual paths are particularly informative, exemplifying the life paths that explain the underrepresentation of members of their group, just as others are quite anomalous. 

Second, biologists know that selection pressures related to one trait can interact with those associated with another trait in surprising ways. This insight neatly lines up with the concept of intersectionality and helps to keep one alive to the ways in which subpopulations within underrepresented groups may have much better or much worse outcomes than other members of the group. (Consider the outcomes for women from wealthy backgrounds or Indigenous women and how they might differ from women in general.) 

Third, selection is about the relationship of a group of individuals who share some trait to an environment; changing the environment can significantly change the outcomes for, and thus representation of, a group. So, this basically reframes our second question as what is it about professional philosophy that selects certain groups in, and other groups out of, our discipline and our community? There is a wealth of information on this topic that describes how people from underrepresented groups have found academic philosophy a hostile environment, such as the “what’s it like” blogs (What’s It Like to Be a Woman in Philosophy? What’s It Like to Be a Person of Color in Philosophy?), as well as a good deal of social psychology about things like implicit bias, institutional discrimination, and stereotype threat (Greenwald, McGhee, and Schwartz 1998; Saul 2013; Schouten 2015; Steele, Spencer, and Aronson 2002). 

The final question is: Are these selection processes just? This question can be directed in various ways. Are the results of these selection pressures just? In other words, is the current underrepresentation of various groups itself an injustice? Is the selective environment as a whole just? Are specific selection pressures just? 

When we find injustice it behooves us to figure out ways to ameliorate it. This is what the Good Equity Practices document seeks to do. Though it is far from comprehensive and will, presumably, need to evolve over time as our equity issues change, it seeks to identify places where members of underrepresented groups are selected out of philosophy as well as methods for creating an environment where they can flourish with the goal of keeping them in. The hope is that documents like these will become unnecessary but, until the demographics of professional philosophy begin to look significantly more like that of Canada at large, we have some serious work to do. 

 

References

Greenwald, A., D. McGhee, & J. Schwartz. 1998, "Measuring individual differences in implicit cognition: The implicit association test," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74: 1464-1480.

Saul, Jennifer. 2013. "Implicit Bias, Stereotype Threat and Women in Philosophy" in Women in Philosophy What Needs to Change? Ed. by Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins, Oxford University Press, New York: NY. pp 39-60.

Schouten, Gina. 2015. "The Stereotype Threat Hypothesis: An Assessment form the Philosopher's Armchair, for the Philosopher's Classroom," Hypatia 30(2): 450-466.

Steele, Claude M., Steven J. Spencer and Joshua Aronson. 2002. "Contending with Group Image: The Psychology of Stereotype and Social Identity Threat," Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 34: 379-440.

 


 

Qui est où? Pourquoi? Et est-ce juste?

28 août 2018 par Letitia Meynell (page en anglais seulement)

Traduction: Johanne Roberge

Cette semaine, le Comité d’équité de l’ACP a lancé un nouveau site web offrant un ensemble de pratiques exemplaires en matière d’équité, élaborées pour aider à remédier à la sous-représentation de divers groupes en philosophie. (Étant donné que certains enjeux sont assez différents dans les départements francophones, une simple traduction ne suffirait pas. C’est pourquoi nous collaborons actuellement avec le Comité équité de la Société de philosophie du Québec afin de créer une version française).

Certains pourraient se demander s’il est vraiment nécessaire d’essayer de modifier nos pratiques afin de diversifier notre discipline, en supposant que la philosophie professionnelle au Canada soit tout à fait acceptable telle quelle. Ils peuvent penser que ces efforts sont inutiles, ou encore, qu’ils visent à détourner la philosophie académique à des fins politiques. Plutôt que de soulever directement ces préoccupations par les moyens habituels — en employant des concepts tels que « discrimination systémique », « microagression », « oppression », « identité », « féminisme » et « suprématie blanche » — que beaucoup de gens semblent trouver plutôt déroutants — je propose une approche différente. J’espère que cela aidera les gens qui ne prennent généralement pas la question de l’équité au sérieux à développer une façon de penser qui les aidera à comprendre pourquoi certains croient que la philosophie universitaire a un grave problème et de quelle façon nous devrions tous œuvrer à le régler.

Mon approche est assez générique et peut être utilisée comme façon de penser partout dans la société où divers groupes sont systématiquement sous-représentés ou surreprésentés socialement. Essentiellement, cela revient à poser trois questions : quelle est la répartition des différents groupes? Comment en sont-ils arrivés là? Et la situation est-elle juste?

En ce qui concerne la première question, « toutes choses étant égales par ailleurs », on s’attendrait à ce que la population des philosophes professionnels canadiens reflète, à peu près, la population canadienne en général — une moitié de femmes, 15 personnes sur 20 de race blanche, une personne sur 20 d’origine autochtone, une personne sur 10 ayant une invalidité quelconque (et ainsi de suite). Choisissez votre niveau de signification statistique préférée et vous constaterez à quel point la divergence par rapport à ce niveau est trop surprenante pour être le fruit du hasard.

La deuxième question vise simplement à comprendre ce qui a causé cette divergence par rapport à la population générale. Je trouve utile d’y réfléchir en tant que processus de sélection, comparables à ceux abordés en biologie évolutionniste (sans que l’héritage joue un rôle, évidemment). Après tout, nous parlons de populations et de la façon dont diverses sous-populations ayant des traits socialement importants se retrouvent dans des environnements (c.-à-d. le milieu universitaire en général et la philosophie en particulier) qui sont plus ou moins propices à leur épanouissement scolaire et personnel.

Il y a certains avantages à l’aborder de cette façon. Premièrement, la théorie de la sélection reconnait que chaque individu a un cheminement de vie unique et que le concept d’identification des pressions de sélection est une idéalisation qui saisit les tendances générales ayant des effets dans la population. Cela minimise donc la pensée voulant que si une personne d’un groupe particulier a réussi, alors n’importe qui de ce groupe peut en faire autant. Néanmoins, certains parcours individuels sont particulièrement instructifs, illustrant les parcours de vie qui expliquent la sous-représentation des membres de leur groupe, tout comme d’autres qui sont assez irréguliers.

Deuxièmement, les biologistes savent que les pressions de sélection liées à un caractère peuvent interagir de façon surprenante avec celles associées à un autre caractère. Ce point de vue s’harmonise parfaitement avec le concept de l’intersectionnalité et aide à garder vivante la façon dont les sous-populations au sein des groupes sous-représentés peuvent obtenir des résultats bien meilleurs ou bien pires que ceux des autres membres du groupe. (Examinez les résultats concernant les femmes issues de milieux aisés ou les femmes autochtones et vous verrez à quel point ils peuvent différer des résultats des femmes de la population générale.)

Troisièmement, la sélection porte sur la relation d’un groupe d’individus qui partagent un trait commun à un environnement; changer l’environnement peut modifier considérablement les résultats pour un groupe, et donc sa représentation. Par conséquent, cela redéfinit fondamentalement notre deuxième question, qui est de savoir ce qu’il en est de la philosophie professionnelle qui sélectionne certains groupes dans notre discipline et dans notre communauté, et d’autres groupes à l’extérieur de notre discipline et de notre communauté? Il existe une mine d’informations à ce sujet, décrivant de quelle façon les personnes issues de groupes sous-représentés trouvent que la philosophie académique est un environnement hostile, comme les blogues « What's it like » (How's It Like to Be a Woman in Philosophy? What’s It Like to Be a Person of Color in Philosophy?), ainsi qu’une bonne partie de la psychologie sociale sur des sujets comme les partis pris sociaux, la discrimination institutionnelle et la menace stéréotypée (Greenwald, McGhee et Schwartz 1998 ; Saul 2013 ; Schouten 2015 ; Steele, Spencer, et Aronson 2002).

La dernière question est la suivante : ces processus de sélection sont-ils justes? Cette question peut être posée de différentes manières. Les résultats de ces pressions de sélection sont-ils justes? En d’autres termes, la sous-représentation actuelle des divers groupes est-elle en soi une injustice? L’environnement sélectif dans son ensemble est-il juste? Les pressions sélectives sont-elles justes?

Quand nous trouvons une injustice, il nous incombe de trouver des moyens de la corriger. C’est ce que cherche à faire le document sur les bonnes pratiques en matière d’équité (en anglais seulement). Bien qu’il soit loin d’être exhaustif et qu’il devra vraisemblablement évoluer au fil du temps et à mesure que nos questions relatives à l’équité évolueront, il vise à définir les endroits où les membres de groupes sous-représentés sont choisis en fonction de la philosophie ainsi que des méthodes pour créer un environnement où ces membres peuvent s’épanouir, et ce, dans le but de les retenir. Nous espérons qu’un tel document deviendra inutile, mais tant que la démographie de la philosophie professionnelle ne se rapprochera de celle du Canada en général, nous avons un sérieux travail à accomplir.

Références

Greenwald, A., D. McGhee, & J. Schwartz. 1998, « Measuring individual differences in implicit cognition: The implicit association test », Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74: 1464-1480.

Saul, Jennifer. 2013. « Implicit Bias, Stereotype Threat and Women in Philosophy » in Women in Philosophy What Needs to Change? Ed. by Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins, Oxford University Press, New York: NY. pp 39-60.

Schouten, Gina. 2015. « The Stereotype Threat Hypothesis: An Assessment form the Philosopher's Armchair, for the Philosopher's Classroom », Hypatia 30(2): 450-466.

Steele, Claude M., Steven J. Spencer and Joshua Aronson. 2002. « Contending with Group Image: The Psychology of Stereotype and Social Identity Threat », Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 34: 379-440.